Boolean

A value of True or False. With the method bool you can interpret an output as a boolean value.

input_param  = 1
bool(#input_param)
true

input_param = 2.1
bool(#input_param)
true

Any number greater than 0 is interpreted as True.


input_param = 2,1
bool(#input_param)

bool(value) expects 1 parameters, 2 given

We use a dot notation for real numbers.


input_param = 0
bool(#input_param)

false

input_param = -1
bool(#input_param)
false

Any number less than or equal to 0 is interpreted as False.


input_param = "1"
bool(#input_param)
false

String representation of a number cannot be interpreted.


input_param = True
bool(#input_param)
true

Case insensitive.


input_param = "tRuE"
bool(#input_param)
true

String representation of a true/false is case insensitive.


input_param = "False"
bool(#input_param)
false

String representation of a true/false is case insensitive.


input_param = "abc123"
bool(#input_param)
false

Only string representation of atrue will be evaluated to true. Everything else in string representation evaluates to false.

Date

A date object represents a date (year, month and day). You can use date(str) to create a date object from a string using auto-detection or you can use date(str, format) to get the date from an arbitrary format. Format parameter is a string containing Format Tokens.

Following methods can use dates:

The following formats are guaranteed to work with auto-detection:

Format code Example Description
YYYY-MM-DD 2018-07-15 ISO 8601 date
YYYY-MM-DDTHH:mmZ 2018-07-15T14:48+0200 ISO 8601 datetime with timezone
YYYY-MM-DD HH:mm 2018-07-15 14:48 ISO 8601-like (not a standard)
DD.MM.YYYY 15.07.2018 German numeric date
DD.MM.YYYY HH:mm 15.07.2018 14:48 German datetime
DD.MM.YYYY HH:mm Z 15.07.2018 14:48 +0200 German datetime with timezone
X 1531658880 Unix timestamp (seconds since 1970)

For all other formats, we highly recommended to specify the format string, as there can be cases where it fails for some dates but not others. In particular, US-style dates ("07/15/2019") will not work when the day number is below 12.

input_param = "06.04.2019"
date(#input_param)
<date 2019-04-06>

input_param = "2019/06/12"
date(#input_param)
<date 2019-12-06>

input_param = "2019/06/12"
date(#input_param, "YYYY/MM/dd")
<date 2019-06-12>

Please note that when using the date() function, the time component is explicitly discarded; it will be assumed as 0:00 UTC if needed. To supply a date and time value with timezone, please pass an ISO-8601 datetime string as documented above directly to date_convert()/date_add().

Decimal

A positive or negative number or zero. Also called a real number. A Decimal can be any negative or positive number with approximately 300 digits.

You can use the method numeric() to try to interpret an input parameter as a real number.


input_param = "1,2"
numeric(#input_param)
1.2

The output uses the dot notation.


input_param = "abc"
numeric(#input_param)
Could not convert "abc" of type "str" to type Decimal".

input_param = "1,23a"
numeric(#input_param)
Could not convert "1,23a" of type "str" to type "Decimal".

Integer

A positive or negative number or zero. Also called a whole number.

You can use the method int() to interpret a Node input as an integer.


input_param = "1"
int(#input_param)
1

Example string "1" (data type: string) was interpreted as an integer.


input_param = "abc"
int(#input_param)
Could not convert "abc" of type "str" to type "int".

input_param = "123a"
int(#input_param)
Could not convert "123a" of type "str" to type "int".

List

List represents a data structure that can contain indexed elements of different values (e.g. integer), reference types (e.g. string) or objects.

Use [ and ]-brackets to construct a list or to access a list element.

Method list() tries to interpret a constructed list as a list.

Construct a list

input_param1 = "abc"
input_param2 = "xyz"
[#input_param1, #input_param2]
["abc","xyz"]

input_param1 = {"dummykey":"dummyvalue"}
input_param2 = "1a3"
input_param3 = 42
[#input_param1, #input_param2, #input_param3]
[{"dummykey":"dummyvalue"},"1a3",42]

#input_param1 is an object, #input_param2 is a string and #input_param3 is an integer.

Accessing an element in a list

input_param = ["string1", "string2"]
#input_param[1]
"string2"

input_param1 = ["string1", "string2"]
#input_param1[0]
"string1"

The integer between the square brackets represents the index of a list. The first element of a list has the index 0 (e.g. #param1[0]).

Object

An Object represents a data structure that contains a set of string keys to values pairs.

Examples:

  1. {"ExampleKey1": "ExampleValue"}
  2. {"ExampleKey1": 123456, "ExampleKey2": ["string", 12345]}
  3. {"ExampleKey1": {"ExampleKey1": ["string", 12345], "ExampleKey2": ["string", 12345] }}

Use { and }-brackets to construct an object.

list() converts an object to a sequence of [key, value] pairs; object() does the reverse. Together with filter() and map() this can be used to modify objects.

Construct an object

#input_param = [["Brand", "Xiaomi"], ["Model", "Mi Mix"]]
object(#input_param)
{"Brand":"Xiaomi", "Model":"Mi Mix"}

Get a value from an object

To access a value from a single of multiple objects use the following methods:

It is necessary to bundle the object or objects in a list before accessing them.

String

A string represents a sequence of zero ("") or more Unicode characters ("abc.....").

You can use the method str() to interpret an input parameter as a string object.

input_param = 123
str(#input_param)
"123"

Example integer 123 (data type: integer) could be interpreted as a string "123".